Cambodia dating scams

Lina Goldberg published the excellent “Move to Cambodia: A Guide to Living and Working in the Kingdom of Wonder” in late 2012.

Earlier this year, Khmer440 contributor Gabi Yetter released her own very well-received manual, “The Definitive Guide to Southeast Asia: Cambodia.” Both of these books provide helpful information and optimistic encouragement to readers who are considering relocating to Cambodia.

Even easily treatable illnesses can quickly become life-threatening if Cambodian doctors get involved.

Sometimes expats in Cambodia succumb not to illness, but to traffic accidents or other hazards.

While children may be coddled and overprotected in Western societies, they are simply left to their Darwinian fate in Cambodia.

Cambodian children are often seen wandering the streets without adult supervision or perched helmetless on the front of passing motorbikes.

This leads to weekly reports of expats in their forties and fifties being found dead on their bathroom floors from a “heart attack” or “fall.” Cambodia is full of dangers, and very few of the locals even know basic first aid.

Kids are also more likely to be involved in accidents requiring emergency medical care, because kids are fragile and kind of stupid.

Fortunately, a lot of those dudes haven’t made it past Sihanoukville.

There has been such an overwhelming interest in moving to Cambodia that two recent books have been published on the topic.

Expats like to ride motorbikes, often helmetless, presumably because they think it makes them look cool.

This can be rather dangerous in a country with reckless local drivers, no enforcement of traffic laws, and poor emergency medical care.