Validating phone number

Otherwise your application needs to provide this function.

Passwords need to be stored encrypted in the database or elsewhere and any backups should also be encrypted.

A few simple form attributes can have the same effect as reams of Java Script code libraries.

Here we have an enhanced version of the above code where we've added HTML5 handler to the first password field which updates the pattern required by the second password field - in effect forcing them to be identical: Here you can see a screen shot from Safari of the form being completed.

Because the input type obscures the text typed, you should let the user confirm that they haven't made a mistake.

The simplest way to do this is to have the password entered twice, and then check that they are identical.

The red/green markers have been implemented using CSS: In this example it should be clear to the user that the form can only be submitted once all three green ticks appear.

In any case browsers such as Firefox and Opera will enforce the HTML5 validation rules and present messages as shown here: Presumably the browser messages will change according to the users language - something that would never be possible using only Java Script.

You might also want to spice up your forms using HTML5 Form Validation as we've done further down the page.

Instead of as this lets the browser (and the user) know that the contents of that field need to be secured.

The password won't appear on the screen as you type and most browsers also won't 'remember' the values entered in fields as they do with other form elements.

A lot of websites now require registration, meaning that users need to be assigned a username and password.

Here are some simple steps to make the process more secure.